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Agile Development Stories
Agile team member pointing at user stories written on sticky notes What’s the Problem with User Stories?

Agile projects focus on very lightweight, simple requirements embodied in user stories. However, there are some problems with relying solely on user stories. They often don't contain enough accuracy for development, testing, or industry regulations. There's a better way to write detailed requirements that are still agile.

Adam Sandman's picture
Adam Sandman
How to Make a Fixed-Scope Contract More Agile

Establishing a contract that genuinely supports agile methods can be a significant challenge. By its very nature, a contract that specifies detailed, upfront deliverables contravenes the principles of flexibility and adaptation that are at the heart of agile. But it is possible—both parties just need to focus on results.

Jamie Cooke's picture
Jamie Cooke
Software designers, developers and other team members collaborating The Real Value of Cross-Functional Agile Teams

Agile teams know that cross-functional collaboration is central to the methodology, but there are often barriers to fully embracing this idea. If teams are used to handoffs, it may seem like it makes sense to maintain the status quo. Try collaborating on something small to realize the true value of cross-functional teams.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Group of game pieces with one left behind Leave No Tester Behind

Creating comprehensive automated tests within a sprint can be a challenge. If the testers don't finish the automation and the rest of the team moves on, testers get left behind and can't catch up. You need some techniques to keep everyone together and ensure that all essential work is accomplished—including test automation.

Hans Buwalda's picture
Hans Buwalda
Agile team talking about their struggles Build Stronger Agile Teams by Getting Real about Mental Health

How much more effective would our teams be if we created an environment that was psychologically safe enough to be honest about how we're feeling? Mental health can be difficult to talk about, but we can use the agile frameworks of standups and retrospectives as a blueprint to share with our teams. Here's how to speak up.

Jenna Charlton's picture
Jenna Charlton
An agile acrobat holds himself perpendicular to a wall An Agile Mindset Teaches the Lessons We Need for COVID-19

Since we can't control the COVID-19 situation besides following safety protocols, and updates change almost daily, our circumstances necessitate agility from everyone, from employees to company leads. Let’s look at the practical agility lessons COVID-19 is teaching us and why an agile mindset is even more important now.

Bharathan Venkateswaran's picture
Bharathan Venka...
Software engineer looking at her computer monitors and integrating code Code Integration: When Moving Slowly Actually Has More Risk

Many decisions about code branching models are made in the name of managing risk, and teams sometimes pick models that make integration harder in the name of safety. Moving slowly and placing barriers to change can seem safer, but agile teams work best when they acknowledge that there is also risk in deferring change.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Agile team coming up with three-point estimate for a project 3 Questions for Easier, Less Stressful Project Estimates

In agile development, the idea of precise estimates is unrealistic. But estimates are needed to inform decision-makers about whether it's worth solving a problem as it is currently understood. It sounds counterintuitive, but instead of asking for one estimate of cost and schedule, ask for three. Here's why it's more useful.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall