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Laptop with code on the screen Code Katas for Testers

A kata is a small programming task you build a solution to. The point is to develop programming skill through familiarity with programming patterns, which is a useful practice for testers today. You’ll learn about software development, testing, continuous integration, exploration—and even how to be a better person.

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman
A group of people participating in a mob programming session Mob Programming: Working Well Together

Mob programming is a whole-team approach to creating software where everyone works together on the same thing at the same computer. It's not a bunch of people watching one person write code, but rather everyone thinking, discussing, designing, and collaborating. Sound crazy? Here's how it improves the quality of code.

Woody Zuill's picture
Woody Zuill
Pipelines, photo by Bernard Hermant Testing Your DevOps Is Just as Important as Testing Your Software

Many DevOps engineers fail to test their automation code in the same way they test the software they deploy. It's crucial for software to have tests, and this should apply to infrastructure-as-code software too, if we plan to change and improve this code with no worries about breaking automation in our DevOps pipeline.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Tester paired with a developer, photo by Alvaro Reyes Elevate Code Quality by Integrating Testing and Development

Pair programming generally involves two programmers working on a single change from start to finish. You can augment this pattern by adding a test specialist, so you can test-drive feature changes first and the tester can ask questions and guide test and code design. What you get is quality built in from the start.

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman
code Do Testers Really Need to Learn How to Code?

Because automation, AI, and agile have changed how we test software, the thought is that testers need to understand a certain amount of coding so that they can make themselves more well-rounded and better able to adapt within a software project. But there are other things testers can focus on before learning to code.

Josiah Renaudin's picture
Josiah Renaudin
Tricycle Testing in a Pair Programming Environment

If a development team does pair programming, where does testing fit in? You don't have to wait until the programming is done—testers can be part of the whole process, from code design to reviewing changes to production. Pair programming plus a good automation strategy mean quality is built in throughout development.

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman
Programmer coding A Tester’s Guide to Choosing a Programming Language

Many testers want to learn a programming language, but how should they decide which one? Justin Rohrman suggests finding an authentic problem to solve and moving from there to determine which language would be best. You can also ask developer coworkers for suggestions and help—take advantage of available resources.

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman
Computer with a "Retired!" sign Think through System Changes to Anticipate Quality Issues

When you replace or significantly modify components of a larger system, too frequently we focus on whether the code we are building functions correctly. This is important, but it’s also short-sighted. It’s easy to introduce errors because we are changing interactions. Coding bugs are only one quality problem.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall