retrospectives | TechWell

retrospectives

Two agile team members exchanging feedback in a retrospective 6 Ways to Share Negative Feedback in a Retrospective

Negative feedback has the greatest potential to help people change in areas that can have a lasting impact. But sharing negative experiences and criticism can often be a challenge and may cause more harm than good. Here are six tips for sharing negative experiences effectively and building trust along the way.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Signs pointing toward success one way and failure the other What You Can Learn from Failure—and from Success

Success and failure teach different lessons. Lessons from failure tend to revolve around what not to do next time around, whereas lessons from success focus on what you can do again, perhaps even better. But whether you experience success or failure, the key is to take the time to learn from what happened.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Continuous improvement Driving Continuous Improvement to the Entire Organization

In traditional agile approaches, retrospectives are valuable to team improvement. However, when teams encounter organizational issues beyond their control, such as project structure, interorganizational communication, or resources, it's more difficult. Here's how to expand continuous improvement to the whole company.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Someone about to plunge into water Catch Small Failures Early with Agile Practices

Agile is designed to keep failures small and manageable. It’s essential to be able to talk about small failures and ways to improve during the retrospective so that the teams can advance their agile practices. If your teams can’t talk about their small failures openly, there is a great risk of bigger troubles soon.

Ryan Ripley's picture
Ryan Ripley
Start the New Year with a Retrospective

This new year, instead of a resolution, consider a retrospective. Rather than just setting one large goal for yourself, you review what you've been doing, what's been working and what hasn't, what you want to accomplish, and what small steps you can take every day to reach your objective.

Johanna Rothman's picture
Johanna Rothman
Making Time for Reflection

How often do you reflect on your career or life? It can be difficult to examine how you work and live to confirm that you are where you want to be. But using some of the same questions and techniques employed in agile retrospectives can help you evaluate your personal choices, too—and brainstorm ideas.

Johanna Rothman's picture
Johanna Rothman
Book Review: Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives

Retrospectives are valuable but often neglected agile practices. Some teams struggle to take the time to hold them, and others don't know how. The book Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives: A Toolbox of Retrospective Exercises can help you keep your retrospectives engaging and useful.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Why Did Agile Fail on Such a Massive Stage?

News of the recent collapse of a welfare reform project in the UK has agile in its crosshairs and does little else but blame the philosophy for the project's failure. But a recently released retrospective-like report shows that perhaps the expectations of agile were unrealistic, to say the least.

Noel Wurst's picture
Noel Wurst