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operating systems

China Challenging Google and Microsoft in OS War

Thanks to a lack of trust in the United States' surveillance policies, China hopes to replace massively popular properties such as Windows and Android as the leading OS in the country, both on mobile and desktop devices. The current target date for release is October.

Josiah Renaudin's picture
Josiah Renaudin
What Has Changed Since Support for Windows XP Was Retired?

April 8 marked the end of Microsoft's official support for its most successful operating system, Windows XP. However, 25 percent of desktop operating system users still run it, and Microsoft just released a security patch that supports it. What's really changed with XP for developers and testers?

Mukesh Sharma's picture
Mukesh Sharma
HTML5: Making Moves in Mobile Markets

In the US and Europe, Android and Apple’s iOS dominate the markets for mobile web app development. However, other markets in the world—where HTML5 is playing a significant role in mobile development—tell a different story. Read on to see how HTML5 edges out iOS and gives Android cause for concern.

Cameron Philipp-Edmonds's picture
Cameron Philipp...
Will We See the Debut of Dual OS Mobile Phones This Year?

Microsoft is exploring possibilities of partnering with Android handset makers to build devices that boot up with two mobile operating systems, giving users the option at run time to choose which one they want. This move will pose new opportunities for mobile software engineers and for testers.

Mukesh Sharma's picture
Mukesh Sharma
Pay Attention to Software Fragmentation

Everyone knows there are a number of different operating system and browser versions currently in use. Just how fragmented is the world of software and how much do you need to pay attention to older versions?

Jamie Saine's picture
Jamie Saine
Don’t Forsake BlackBerry Development

BlackBerry has fallen far from its once lofty status as one of the top (if not the top) mobile operating systems. But recent numbers, a warm response to BlackBerry 10, and some smart choices made by RIM mean you might need to start developing for BlackBerry again.

Jamie Saine's picture
Jamie Saine