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reviews

Team doing a project review 5 Questions to Ask in a Project Review

Project managers often dread doing reviews, but they're necessary to make sure the project is on the right track. Progress can be affected by unclear definitions, risk, schedules, and cost, so it's important to evaluate whether the project manager, sponsors, and team members are all on the same page.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall
Start the New Year with a Retrospective

This new year, instead of a resolution, consider a retrospective. Rather than just setting one large goal for yourself, you review what you've been doing, what's been working and what hasn't, what you want to accomplish, and what small steps you can take every day to reach your objective.

Johanna Rothman's picture
Johanna Rothman
Making Time for Reflection

How often do you reflect on your career or life? It can be difficult to examine how you work and live to confirm that you are where you want to be. But using some of the same questions and techniques employed in agile retrospectives can help you evaluate your personal choices, too—and brainstorm ideas.

Johanna Rothman's picture
Johanna Rothman
Ignore the Data at Your Own Risk

At work, the evidence of something worth paying attention to is often front and center, and yet we dismiss it. If you ignore the data—negative survey results, team member absences, an increase in bugs, stakeholders who repeatedly miss meetings, etc.—you could be overlooking signs of trouble.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Are Your Testing Practices In Line with Today’s Needs?

Practices in any discipline need continuous review to ensure they are still effective and in line with current requirements. Software testing practices are no exception—the development landscape is highly dynamic, requiring periodic updating of practices. How and when should you review? Read on.

Rajini  Padmanaban's picture
Rajini Padmanaban
Are You Focusing on the Right Thing in Your Sprint Reviews?

The role of demonstration in a sprint review often takes on more importance than it should, even to the extent that some teams refer to the review as a demo. By focusing on the demo you risk having the team do all the talking, rather than a two-way conversation between the team and the stakeholders.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Five Principles from Chess That Can Change Your Software Game

When you start analyzing the two strategic activities of playing chess and developing software, you will notice they share many core principles. Defining a goal, recognizing patterns, and learning from mistakes are just some of the important concepts to keep in mind with both chess and software.

Charlie Hill's picture
Charlie Hill
Book Review: Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives

Retrospectives are valuable but often neglected agile practices. Some teams struggle to take the time to hold them, and others don't know how. The book Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives: A Toolbox of Retrospective Exercises can help you keep your retrospectives engaging and useful.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk