product development

Scaling Product Agility: More Product, Not More Process

Focusing on scaling product discovery that feeds product delivery is valuable to scaling frameworks. A cross-team product discovery cadence highlights work that's valuable to everyone and facilitates workflow for all the teams, helping them produce more of what they really need (and less of what they don’t).

David Hussman's picture
David Hussman
The Maker Movement Moves to the White House

Is the US still a nation of “makers” instead of merely passive consumers? The White House likes to think so. Proclaiming June 18 a “National Day of Making,” the White House hosted its first Maker Faire and, in a way, authenticated the growing Maker Movement with the government’s stamp of approval.

Pamela Rentz's picture
Pamela Rentz
The Cost of Delay for Not Shipping on Time

The cost of delay is the way to think about the revenue you can lose plus the cost of continued development. When you delay your release and don’t ship on time, you miss the revenue from the maximum sales times. Shipping on time isn't always easy, but it's easy to see why you need to.

Johanna Rothman's picture
Johanna Rothman
Focus on Users' Needs Rather Than on Your Software Product

Bonnie Bailey explains that you need to take care of your users’ needs first, and then, just maybe, they will explore the fabulous features of your software. When we focus on our product rather than on what the user is trying to get done, we suffer from marketing myopia.

Bonnie Bailey's picture
Bonnie Bailey
How Agile Led to the Creation of the Technical Product Owner

Agile has become the primary mechanism by which normally incompatible roles crossbreed and create distinctive positions that bring great value to a company. Steve Vaughn writes on how agile has led to the creation of a new role—the technical product owner—that has benefited his team.

Steve Vaughn's picture
Steve Vaughn
The Difference between Outcome and Output in Product Development

To be successful in product development, we must minimize the number of product features while also delivering what the customer will like. In other words, product development success is governed by our ability to maximize the “outcome” rather than “output” of product development.

Sameh Zeid's picture
Sameh Zeid
Why Limiting Work-in-Process Is Important

There is a certain mindset that is hindering organizations from limiting their work-in-process (WIP) during product delivery. You might ask yourself why limiting WIP is important. Sameh Zeid writes that better software quality is attained when we limit the WIP.

Sameh Zeid's picture
Sameh Zeid