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scrum

Red apple fitting in with green apples Making Testing Work within Your Sprints

A common problem for Scrum teams is having a good understanding of what work is complete by the end of the sprint. Teams often end with a few items coded but not fully tested, but since the goal of a sprint is to have a deliverable increment of work, skipping tests isn’t a good idea. Here's how you can fit them in.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Looking upward at trees in a forest Scrum Can Help You See the Forest and the Trees

In project management, it's easy to focus on details to the extent that you lose track of the larger goal. Scrum can help you identify flaws and gaps, and skipping or trivializing Scrum events will just hide the fact that there are things you need to improve. Finding problems is something to be celebrated, not hidden.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
A watch with the second hand moving fast The Agile Culture You Need for Faster Pull Requests

Is your process for pull requests compromising your team's agility? You can structure your changes in a way that facilitates more rapid feedback, but even then it is still possible to have a slow integration time if people don’t review pull requests promptly. Mechanics are part of it, but culture also matters.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Scrum team member taking a card from the product backlog The Difference between Priority and Order in Your Agile Work

The Scrum Guide talks about an ordered backlog, not a prioritized one. While order and priority are related, they are not the same, and understanding the difference and why people focus on one over the other can help your team be more effective at delivering business value.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Scrum team's technical lead sitting at a laptop Do’s and Don’ts for Having a Technical Lead on a Scrum Team

Technical leads can be useful, both within the dev team and as a go-between. But is that a good idea on a Scrum team, which should be self-organizing? There is nothing wrong with having a technical lead on your team, as long as the role doesn’t impede the team. Here's where a tech lead can help or hurt a Scrum team.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Agile team members refining the product backlog Refine Your Product Backlog Continuously to Improve Flow

One way to address poorly defined product backlog items is to spend time refining the items as you go. Refining the backlog continuously helps the team deliver consistently and can lead to shorter planning meetings at the start of the sprint. It can even help improve reliability, velocity, and the quality of work.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Bright light bulb 2 Good Practices Agile Says You Don’t Need

There are lots of good practices that people will tell you aren’t agile. Usually this comes from people who read a book on Scrum or Extreme Programming and took it literally. But agile is not methods and tools associated with a particular methodology; as long as you follow the agile principles, anything is fair game.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
Mr. Miyagi from The Karate Kid Learn Agile Principles Indirectly through Practice

One of the primary questions for agile teams adopting a new approach such as Scrum is whether to start with principles or practices. Sometimes the best way to learn principles is indirectly, through practice. Experiences are a great way to learn, and sometimes they even teach you skills without your realizing it.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk