people management | TechWell

people management

Agile team bumping fists Transforming a Team of Agile Skeptics into Agilists

Coaching an agile-skeptical team demands a personalized approach. Agile introduces a different way of working and thinking, and leaders must find a way to overcome resistance and foster a collaborative culture. Take these three steps to move toward achieving an agile mindset and realizing the benefits of agile.

Scott Weiner's picture
Scott Weiner
Two agile developers learning together Maximizing Agile by Understanding Learning Styles

To be most agile with your communication, understand several models of learning styles, where you fit into them, and where your team fits into them. By tweaking the ways you communicate to fit the information and the situation, you are helping your team remain agile by valuing people and interactions over processes.

Robin Foster's picture
Robin Foster
A good leader asking her team questions Providing Value as a Leader: More Than Just Being the Boss

As a leader, your job is not to be the boss and check on every task, but to provide value to your team, helping them grow, learn to fix things, and make decisions without you. One of the best ways to provide value is by asking questions. Questions clarify expectations, confirm understanding, and build relationships.

Jeff Abshoff's picture
Jeff Abshoff
Agile team made of different people all bumping fists How Embracing Differences Makes More Robust Agile Teams

On any team, there are bound to be some differences. But even though work styles may differ from what you expect, they may not be problematic simply because they are different. Before making assumptions about what a teammate is doing or why, just ask to find out. Their differences may bring a helpful new perspective.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Team member sending an email Stop Email Overload and Communicate Better

Many of us fire off correspondence to groups and distribution lists that include more recipients than necessary, and we overcommunicate without stopping to think about exactly what needs to be conveyed. Here are some ways organizations and teams can cope with the influx of information and communicate intentionally.

Richard Estra's picture
Richard Estra
Woman being interviewed for a job as a software tester Transitioning to Testing: The Qualities We Should Be Looking For

Testing is an accessible career choice for people who don't come from the typical paths into a tech job. Previous jobs and formal education should matter less than the abilities to observe, identify risks, and report that information. How can we change our interview processes to highlight these skills and mindset?

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman
Team member questioning leader about the project plan How to Question Leadership without Seeming Confrontational

Good leaders sometimes make decisions based on incorrect or incomplete information, and when that happens, we have a professional obligation to encourage them to reconsider. However, correcting them in a confrontational way can be a career-limiting move. Here are four factors to consider when speaking up to leaders.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall
Woman meeting with her new boss to get to know her Tips for Dealing with a New Boss

Simply listening to what a new boss says can be a good way to detect what’s important to them. Instead of bombarding the boss with an overview of your accomplishments or a declaration of what you view as significant, start by paying attention. You’ll be showing an interest in their needs and demonstrating your value.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten