requirements management | TechWell

requirements management

User stories Use Continuous Backlog Grooming to Refine Agile Requirements

Continuous backlog grooming means systematically refining your user stories: breaking up larger stories, obtaining detailed requirements, writing the requirements in terms of acceptance criteria and acceptance tests, and sharing and refining these details with the team. Acceptance test-driven development can help.

Susan Brockley's picture
Susan Brockley
Jelly Beans and Defect Classification: Different Strategies for Success

When there’s a bowl of jelly beans, some people grab a few at random, but most of us have favorites. If you're crafty and have flexible standards, you can maximize consumption by adjusting your criteria as colors dwindle. Classifying defects should not be like choosing jelly beans; you need firm standards.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall
The Word “Automation” Has Led Us Astray

The misunderstanding that automation for software quality is just doing what humans do (i.e., manual testing), but faster and more often, causes business risk. Unless you’re very clear, the quality measure is incomplete. The word automation distracts from the real value: measuring quality.

Matt Griscom's picture
Matt Griscom
Testing Nonfunctional Requirements in an Agile Lifecycle

As organizations embrace agile, requirements become a challenge because they must be considered and validated in each (short) sprint. Ideally, nonfunctional requirements should be a continuous focus throughout the project. Here are some ways to better address NFRs in an agile development lifecycle.

Michael Sowers's picture
Michael Sowers
Five Techniques for Creating Testable Requirements

Documenting user requirements is always a challenging phase in software development, as there are no standard processes or notations. However, communication and facilitation skills can make this activity easier. Here are five techniques for converting user stories into testable requirements.

Anish Krishnan's picture
Anish Krishnan
Why Testers Should Get Involved in Requirements Engineering

Testers use requirements as the basis of test cases, review them for testability, and often participate in general requirements reviews or inspections. However, many testers have little knowledge of requirements engineering. Erik van Veenendaal provides five critical success factors to get started.

Erik van Veenendaal's picture
Erik van Veenendaal
Maintaining Testable Requirements and Acceptance Criteria

Once a testable requirement or acceptance criteria have been “created,” there is a tendency to assume that the task can be considered completed. Because that may or may not be true, it is better to continue to pay attention to testability. Here are four ways to maintain testable requirements.

Claire Lohr's picture
Claire Lohr
Creating Testable Requirements and Acceptance Criteria

Testable requirements, or acceptance criteria, are the communication of an expectation between its originator and potential stakeholders. Many testers struggle with this starting point. But once you succeed, you know the processes that can build and test a system implementing “good” requirements.

Claire Lohr's picture
Claire Lohr