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test design

A crowd of people walking in the street Crowdsourced Testing: Give the People What They Want

Crowdsourced testing is a great way to connect with users and ensure that the product idea, design, implementation, and nonfunctional elements meet their expectations—or, hopefully, even exceed them. But like any other test effort, crowdsourced testing is both a science and an art. Here's how to do it effectively.

Mukesh Sharma's picture
Mukesh Sharma
Software testers asking questions about a test tool they're considering Before You Buy That Test Tool, Answer These Questions

Tools are a normal part of testing jobs because they can amplify our ability to learn about product quality. It's a good idea to review new tools for automation, performance, or monitoring to see if some solution will help you test better. Before you even look at tools, though, there are two questions you should ask.

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman
Action-based test design checklist Leverage Your Actions to Get More Out of Test Automation

Test design can contribute greatly to how manageable and maintainable your automation is. Hiding detailed steps in actions makes their automation easier to maintain, and the high-level actions can be leveraged to define less common tests. Here's how you can write tests as a sequence of actions to improve coverage.

Hans Buwalda's picture
Hans Buwalda
Mobile tester getting a positive result for a visual regression test on a smartphone Visual Regression Testing: A Critical Part of a Mobile Testing Strategy

Despite our best efforts to replicate customers' behavior in our test automation suites, teams often forget about nonfunctional requirements. An important one is visual perception—how users see and feel each application they use. Visual regression testing can fill a significant gap in user experience expectations.

Dmitry Vinnik's picture
Dmitry Vinnik
Man lifting barbell with heavy weights 6 Steps to Achieve Realistic, Reliable Load Testing

Simulating real users’ behavior gives you a transparent picture of your software's load capabilities. To reproduce users' actions accurately, you can use a request flow design from when the system is in the production environment. Here are six steps for achieving the most realistic load for your load testing process.

Maxim Chernyak's picture
Maxim Chernyak
Two people creating a test strategy document The What, Who, and How of Developing a Test Strategy

In the world of agile, people often think of test strategy documents as outdated or unnecessary. But having a defined plan of action for how you're going to test a system, application, or business function is always useful. Here's how to break that down into what, who, and how so you can understand your tests' purpose.

Espresso being poured into a cup of water and mixing Integrating Threat Modeling into Agile Development

Threat modeling helps you determine where to focus your security testing efforts when building your app. But people often wonder how it can fit into their existing agile software development process. Here are three things you can do to integrate threat modeling into your agile workflow, either early on or mid-project.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Graphic of two people's minds overlapping, showing empathy Bringing Empathy into Quality Engineering

Testers have always been advocates for the end-user. But there are now more opportunities to be that advocate, including emotional intelligence-based testing and role-based testing, which form a critical part of empathetic testing. Building empathy into our software engineering process ends up benefiting everyone.

Rajini  Padmanaban's picture
Rajini Padmanaban