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API code on a laptop Why API Testing Is Mission-Critical

With API testing, if you change how the API works—even if it now works better—it will break all of the code written by people using the API. Consequently, testers have a responsibility to make sure they are testing the same contract that was established when the API was first released. Here's how to test APIs right.

Adam Sandman's picture
Adam Sandman
Infinity sign in lights showing continuous testing 5 Steps to Stable Continuous Testing in DevOps

Continuous testing minimizes risk and ensures DevOps has the tools to deliver quality, modern code that is ready for the future. To fulfill this, you have to first understand the three types of personas in testing. Then, you'll know how to work with them to progress along the path toward achieving continuous testing.

Eran Kinsbruner's picture
Eran Kinsbruner
Test engineers analyzing data models Designing Data Models for Self-Documented Tests

When testing applications, documenting and interpreting test results can be a challenge. Data models enable us to collect and process test data more dynamically and uniformly. To design effective data models for self-documented tests, there are three important things to consider: what to document, collect, and report.

Mimi Balcom Meng's picture
Mimi Balcom Meng
Tester logging an issue in a defect-tracking system Don’t Let “Try It Now” Impede Your Test Initiative

Sometimes environmentally based issues arise that impede your ability to access or test the software. Rather than addressing the problem methodically, as with defects, testers often attempt to solve it on their own. Here's why entering the problem into the defect-tracking database is a more efficient way to solve it.

Richard Estra's picture
Richard Estra
Left arrow painted on a wall 5 Ways to Shift Performance Testing Left

Performance testing is often a barrier to accelerating software delivery. Because you need a production-like environment, performance testing often waits until the entire application is complete. But you shouldn't wait until then to get started. You can begin testing earlier to reduce rework and address issues sooner.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
"No code" typed inside brackets Merging New Codeless Test Automation with Your Existing Code-Based Test Scripts

Adopting a codeless solution can be an amazing boost to quality, productivity, and tester career growth, but in most organizations, such test suites will have to be merged into existing code-based test scripts. To succeed, developers, testers, and management all should consider the differences between the two options.

Eran Kinsbruner's picture
Eran Kinsbruner
Janna Loeffler Is Testing Just Looking for Bugs? A Slack Takeover with Janna Loeffler

Thought leaders from the software community are taking over the TechWell Hub for a day to answer questions and engage in conversations. Janna Loeffler, a software engineer with a variety of quality and testing roles, hosted this Slack takeover, which led to discussions about tools, automation, and what testing is.

Owen Gotimer's picture
Owen Gotimer
Test plan written out Rebuilding Your Test Strategy

If testing is taking awhile and a lot of bugs are getting into production, it's a good idea to review your entire test strategy. Spend some time understanding the current process and what testing is happening through the dev process—not what is outlined in a process wiki, but the work that actually happens.

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman