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agile

Agile team members putting together puzzle pieces Solving Problems and Seeking Solutions on an Agile Team

While teams are composed of individuals, all of whom solve problems and make decisions, people on consistently successful teams understand that they can be more effective when the focus is on the team, not the individual. Making the best decisions collectively delivers the most value to customers in the long run.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
People applauding near a medal saying "2018" Top 10 TechWell Insights Stories of 2018

Many teams are embracing new practices, and several of last year's most-read stories reflect that, with topics such as AI, DevOps, and continuous testing. But it looks like lots of teams also want to get back to basics, because guides to tried-and-true agile and testing methods also ranked high. Check out the roundup.

Beth Romanik's picture
Beth Romanik
Bright light bulb 2 Good Practices Agile Says You Don’t Need

There are lots of good practices that people will tell you aren’t agile. Usually this comes from people who read a book on Scrum or Extreme Programming and took it literally. But agile is not methods and tools associated with a particular methodology; as long as you follow the agile principles, anything is fair game.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
Person estimating an agile story with planning points A Musical Metaphor for Agile Estimation

Many explanations of relative sizing in agile estimation fail to capture the mix of knowledge, skill, and effort involved in completing a task. Learning to play a song seems to capture the core ideas of estimation. With a metaphor, it is easier to come up with baselines to estimate against for your own agile sizing.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Woman working remotely at a computer Agile Collaboration on Remote Teams

The first value in the Agile Manifesto is “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools,” and for many teams, being located in the same place facilitates these interactions. However, being part of an effective, collaborative team is less about location than it is about motivation and good practices.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Apple cut open to reveal an orange inside 6 Signs Your Agile Project Isn’t Really Agile

There's a trend of organizations declaring they are agile without actually changing how they develop software. Declaring that an apple is an orange doesn’t make it so. These six key indicators can help you determine whether your agile project isn’t really agile after all—and give you some solutions to help.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Test pyramid 5 Reasons You Should Have More Unit Tests

The test pyramid is a valuable visual in agile. In particular, it argues that unit tests should make up the majority of tests, and while agile teams recite this principle, it is often not clear why it is so important. Here are five reasons unit tests should make up the majority of tests written for an application.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
A feature branching strategy Feature Branching Is Not Evil

Some people believe branching and pull requests are inherently bad. True, branching done poorly can slow down a team, but advocating for avoiding branching altogether can lead you to ignore the more important goal of an agile process: rapid integration of changes. First, make sure you're considering the right metrics.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk