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feedback

Employee receiving feedback Seeking Feedback the Right Way

Receiving negative feedback can be uncomfortable. You may immediately get defensive. But to grow personally and in your career, you need to be able to receive feedback—both good and bad. Here's how to recognize the three types of feedback you will get, and know how to solicit it and respond to it in the right way.

Allison Scholz's picture
Allison Scholz
A manager and an employee having a one-on-one meeting One-on-Ones: A Framework for Feedback

Regular one-on-one meetings between a manager and employee are a forum to provide safe, timely feedback. They can be short or longer, but you should discuss successes, challenges, and how to improve. Having a framework for the conversation helps you make sure that the meetings don’t routinely become chat sessions.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Santa Claus talking to a child If Santa Can Be Agile, So Can You

To improve his toy development lifecycle, Santa Claus had the North Pole move to an agile and DevOps approach. Santa knows it's important to accept requirements late in the process, work incrementally, deploy on time, and—above all—focus on the customer. Here’s what he found to be more effective with agile and DevOps.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
Manager giving an employee critical feedback How to Give Tough Feedback

It's not easy to give tough feedback. But delaying, withholding, or sugarcoating critical feedback is ultimately a disservice—to the individual, the team, and the work involved. Giving timely, constructive feedback is one of the most important roles of any manager. Here’s how to handle these delicate situations.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Two agile team members exchanging feedback in a retrospective 6 Ways to Share Negative Feedback in a Retrospective

Negative feedback has the greatest potential to help people change in areas that can have a lasting impact. But sharing negative experiences and criticism can often be a challenge and may cause more harm than good. Here are six tips for sharing negative experiences effectively and building trust along the way.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Silver stopwatch Getting Faster Pull Requests in an Agile Environment

Pull requests may not seem to fit into agile development, but they can work well if done right. If you can maintain feedback on your working software from frequent integration, using PRs can help people understand your code. The speed at which PRs can be reviewed depends on three things: context, size, and atomicity.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Road winding through the mountains How to Take the High Road as a Leader

Leaders who invite feedback and then suggest, by word or deed, that only positive feedback is welcome end up ensuring that critical feedback—the kind they really need—will be withheld. If you get feedback from employees that isn't what you wanted to hear, don't act vengeful. Take the high road with your response.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Woman with her finger of her lips in a shushing gesture Use Silence as a Powerful Tool to Get Feedback

If you want feedback from your users, sometimes the best technique for gathering information is staying silent. After someone responds to your question, instead of continuing the conversation, just pause. This encourages the other person to keep talking, and that's when you may get the most valuable information.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten