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hurricane irma satellite image Hurricane Season 2018: Enhanced Forecasting and More Prep Time

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season saw three devastating major hurricanes. Like any team after a release that conducts reviews to see how they can improve, the National Hurricane Center found ways to enhance future communication to the public regarding where a tropical storm is headed and the potential impact.

Pamela Rentz's picture
Pamela Rentz
Hurricane Season 2016: Luna and Surge Are Ready

The 2016 hurricane season is upon us and NOAA, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has more than tripled computing forecasting capacity thanks to two new Cray supercomputers the agency calls “Luna” and “Surge”.

Pamela Rentz's picture
Pamela Rentz
Hurricane Season 2014: Using Technology to Stay Safe

Last year, the National Weather Service unveiled two new weather supercomputers designed to more accurately project storm intensity and structure. For the 2014 hurricane season, NOAA is rolling out a Potential Storm Surge Flooding map to show coastal areas where storm surge could occur.

Pamela Rentz's picture
Pamela Rentz
Can We Fight Climate Change with Maps and Apps?

The White House recently announced the Climate Data Initiative, and the first batch of data provided is on coastal flooding and the sea level rise. The hope is that by making the climate data available, the “maps and apps” developed may reduce the risks associated with extreme weather.

Pamela Rentz's picture
Pamela Rentz
New Weather Supercomputers Ready for 2013 Hurricane Season

On July 25, 2013, the National Weather Service, which is part of NOAA, flipped the switch on two new weather supercomputers that are running an upgraded hurricane research and forecasting model designed to more accurately project storm intensity and structure.

Pamela Rentz's picture
Pamela Rentz