change management | TechWell

change management

Pants that are too short due to growing too fast You Can’t Rush Agile Change

Too often, organizations try to rush agile change. It is usually because they want to see the business benefits of agile as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, change doesn’t work like that—you can’t rush it. In fact, trying to change too fast often results in no change at all. Here are some examples to avoid.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
Sign indicating twisting roads ahead 16 Questions to Assess Your Response to Major Change

If your responsibilities include guiding others through major change, you might find it instructive to assess your own behaviors and response to change. The sixteen questions here can help you do just that. You can also use these questions to facilitate a discussion with your team about a current or upcoming change.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Risk management checklist A Checklist for Managing Go-Live Decisions and Risks

If you have to replace a complex existing data system in production, decisions about when and whether to go live should be treated with gravity and care. One process that can help keep you honest is developing checklists that describe very clearly what is expected to be accomplished and verified at each milestone.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall
Sign in shop window that says "Sorry, no change" Dealing with a Change-Resistant Manager

With almost any change, whether a trivial adjustment in procedures or a large-scale organizational change, people will vary in their receptiveness to it. But if you and your teammates have some good ideas to improve processes and your manager keeps shutting them down, you may be dealing with a change-resistant manager.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Plane coming in for a landing, photo by Sebastian Grochowicz How Do We Land This Thing? Planning for Go-Live and Beyond

Some project managers have little experience bringing a project in for a landing, so they can be dismayed or just blindsided by organizational change needs and stakeholders’ expectations at delivery. Here is a checklist of some commonly forgotten items to address when a project goes live, so be sure to plan for them.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall
A crack forming in concrete, photo by Mahdis Mousavi Handling the Emotional Turmoil of Organizational Change

Chaos, confusion, and emotional turmoil are not unusual during major organizational change. Nevertheless, even people at the top sometimes minimize the impact of the change on employees—and on themselves. Worse, they sometimes do so dismissively. It's important not to underestimate the challenge of managing change.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Manager with megaphone communicating with employees During Times of Major Change, Keep People Informed

During times of major change, readily available information can help reduce the fears of those affected about what it means for them. If you’re involved in implementing change, it’s wise to keep people informed—not just about the change itself, but also about its impact on processes, responsibilities, and expectations.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Arrows pointing to old way and new way An Agile Approach to Change Management

Many organizations are reluctant to introduce new tools or technologies, or even to update existing ones. The reason is often framed in terms of risk management, but agile teams already have the tools to manage the risk of change: testing and experiments. These approaches together eliminate gaps in risk identification.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk