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Software professionals at a table with assorted laptop computers The 4 C’s of Business Success

Business success in the software world depends on many factors, but certain tactics apply whether the company is large or small, in a niche or a wide market. Organizations should focus on these four components—customers, competition, content, and creativity—to craft a smart strategy for success.

Martha Jameson's picture
Martha Jameson
A remote employee's laptop open at a coffee shop 8 Mistakes Managers Make when Working with Remote Teams

When managing a remote team, usual practices apply, but there are some additional considerations you should think about. You need to be sure not to make any blunders that would affect the productivity and happiness of your staff. Here are eight common mistakes managers of remote teams make that you should try to avoid.

Antony Garlton's picture
Antony Garlton
Jeff Payne Maintaining Technical Excellence: A Slack Takeover with Jeff Payne

Thought leaders from the software community are taking over the TechWell Hub for a day to answer questions and engage in conversations. Jeff Payne, the CEO and founder of Coveros, hosted this Slack takeover, discussing agile transformation, automating documentation, and how leaders can maintain technical excellence.

Owen Gotimer's picture
Owen Gotimer
Quarterback about to throw a football Drafting the Right Software Professional for Your Fantasy Team

Teams are systems made up of individuals with different strengths and weaknesses. When people are cooperating on a team—whether in software development or football—sometimes those strengths and weaknesses can be complementary, and other times they can be out of alignment. Be sure to draft the player your team needs.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall
Illustration from Aesop's fable "The North Wind and the Sun" Aesop and Agile: A Moral for Effective Teamwork

When a manager sees a problem on their team, they often want to act quickly to correct it. But if you take a “fix it” mentality too far, while you might get past the initial impediment, you have done little to help the team work better in the future. Let's look at another approach, based on one of Aesop's Fables.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
A manager and employee having a one-on-one meeting Alleviate Employees’ Stress through One-on-Ones

Simply having one-on-ones because they’re expected is not enough to realize their potential. To make one-on-ones effective, as the manager, you’ve got to be available, prepared, and engaged. It has to be more than a one-way status update. Here's how to use these meetings to promote trust, growth, and creativity.

Jason Wick's picture
Jason Wick
Scrum team's technical lead sitting at a laptop Do’s and Don’ts for Having a Technical Lead on a Scrum Team

Technical leads can be useful, both within the dev team and as a go-between. But is that a good idea on a Scrum team, which should be self-organizing? There is nothing wrong with having a technical lead on your team, as long as the role doesn’t impede the team. Here's where a tech lead can help or hurt a Scrum team.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Beware the Bad Apple: 3 Types to Watch for on a Team

We all know some obvious personality types that can be less than ideal to work with. However, there are other personality traits you may want to beware of as well. Although these characteristics may seem perfectly harmless on the surface, in excess they can be just as dangerous to a project as the more glaring types.

Richard Estra's picture
Richard Estra