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communication

Employee receiving feedback Seeking Feedback the Right Way

Receiving negative feedback can be uncomfortable. You may immediately get defensive. But to grow personally and in your career, you need to be able to receive feedback—both good and bad. Here's how to recognize the three types of feedback you will get, and know how to solicit it and respond to it in the right way.

Allison Scholz's picture
Allison Scholz
Person about to shoot a rubber band at a coworker Is There a Place for Pranks in the Office?

Some people think pulling pranks in the office is the height of hilarity. But they should remember that what they view as funny may not be viewed that way by those on the receiving end. There are many opportunities in the workplace for a joke to backfire. Before you think about pulling a prank, think it through.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Text with red proofreading marks For Professional Communication, Check Your Grammar and Punctuation

If you want to be taken seriously at work, you should pay careful attention to your grammar and punctuation in proposals, formal emails, instructions, presentations, blog posts, resumes—pretty much any important written communication. If you frequently make style and usage mistakes, your credibility can take a hit.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
ScrumMaster facilitating communication between an agile team and stakeholders Understanding the ScrumMaster's Role in Team Communication

Some agile teams believe the ScrumMaster is the sole point of communication between them and the product owner, so the team can abdicate any responsibility to communicate with stakeholders. That couldn't be more wrong. It's actually the ScrumMaster's job to enable communication and coach or guide the team to solutions.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Team member sending an email Stop Email Overload and Communicate Better

Many of us fire off correspondence to groups and distribution lists that include more recipients than necessary, and we overcommunicate without stopping to think about exactly what needs to be conveyed. Here are some ways organizations and teams can cope with the influx of information and communicate intentionally.

Richard Estra's picture
Richard Estra
Team member questioning leader about the project plan How to Question Leadership without Seeming Confrontational

Good leaders sometimes make decisions based on incorrect or incomplete information, and when that happens, we have a professional obligation to encourage them to reconsider. However, correcting them in a confrontational way can be a career-limiting move. Here are four factors to consider when speaking up to leaders.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall
Woman meeting with her new boss to get to know her Tips for Dealing with a New Boss

Simply listening to what a new boss says can be a good way to detect what’s important to them. Instead of bombarding the boss with an overview of your accomplishments or a declaration of what you view as significant, start by paying attention. You’ll be showing an interest in their needs and demonstrating your value.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Businessperson talking into a tin can How to Achieve Better Internal Communication

Our methods of communicating are often on “autopilot.” Being more mindful of when and how we communicate can eliminate problems and strengthen internal relationships. There are several things that can be improved or implemented to increase trust and effective communication on any business team. Here are some ideas.

Ann Amen's picture
Ann Amen