collaboration | TechWell

collaboration

Agile team members putting together puzzle pieces Solving Problems and Seeking Solutions on an Agile Team

While teams are composed of individuals, all of whom solve problems and make decisions, people on consistently successful teams understand that they can be more effective when the focus is on the team, not the individual. Making the best decisions collectively delivers the most value to customers in the long run.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Woman working remotely at a computer Agile Collaboration on Remote Teams

The first value in the Agile Manifesto is “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools,” and for many teams, being located in the same place facilitates these interactions. However, being part of an effective, collaborative team is less about location than it is about motivation and good practices.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Apple cut open to reveal an orange inside 6 Signs Your Agile Project Isn’t Really Agile

There's a trend of organizations declaring they are agile without actually changing how they develop software. Declaring that an apple is an orange doesn’t make it so. These six key indicators can help you determine whether your agile project isn’t really agile after all—and give you some solutions to help.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Magnifying glass looking at the words "Software testing" on a computer screen Making Testing Visible

Most testing work is invisible—something that happens inside your head and leaves no artifacts behind. This generally leaves testers feeling like no one understands what they do all day. Here are some ideas for collaborating with your coworkers so they can see—and start to understand—your testing work.

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman
Hand holding a camera lens focusing on faraway mountains Agile and DevOps Bring the Focus Back on Quality

As companies move to agile and DevOps, silos are coming down and there is more interaction and collaboration among teams. Quality is also becoming everyone's responsibility for the entire software development lifecycle. Quality is more than just testing: Consider a quality value stream along the overall value chain.

Michael Sowers's picture
Michael Sowers
Chalkboard showing half analytical and half colorful doodles Helping Introverts and Extroverts Work Together

The personality tendencies of extroversion and introversion concern where people get their energy, and this is key to understanding how coworkers can perceive—and sometimes misinterpret—each other’s behavior. If the introvert-extrovert dynamic poses challenges, consider discussing these differences as a team.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Two people practicing pair programming Solo Programming, Pairing, and Mobbing: Which Is Right for You?

Programming often is considered an individual pursuit, but there are other options gaining popularity: pairing, where you work with another developer or tester, and mobbing, where the entire team works on one thing at a time. Each is effective for certain kinds of challenges. How much collaboration is right for you?

Jeff Langr's picture
Jeff Langr
An airplane in flight, photo by Andrew Palmer What Aircrews Can Teach DevOps Teams

Aircrews learn a set of skills involving a structured way of communicating that breaks down barriers and forces an honest evaluation of the issues. They also automate what they can but still practice their craft over and over again, including what to do during failures. DevOps teams can learn a lot from aircrews.

Peter Varhol's picture
Peter Varhol Gerie Owen