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agile transition

Agile team all putting their hands in the center, photo by Perry Grone Creating a Company Culture Where Agile Will Thrive

A so-called generative culture has all the characteristics necessary to support self-directed teams, shared responsibility, experimentation, and continuous process improvement. But what about the rest of us? Most large organizations don't have a culture where agile will take hold so easily. Here's what needs to change.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
Caution tape stretching across a construction site 5 Pitfalls Agile Coaches Must Avoid

Successful agile teams often have a coach driving continuous improvement. While some coaches are effective initially, many eventually succumb to pitfalls that inhibit their team’s growth and fail to compel any lasting changes. Here are five common pitfalls of agile coaches in most projects that fail to improve.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Giant man who grew too quickly 3 Telltale Signs You’re Scaling Agile Too Quickly

When an organization grows quickly, it puts stress on people, processes, and customers. Burnout happens, things fall through the cracks, and defects creep in. Unfortunately, many organizations try to scale agile too quickly, and that often leads to failure. Here are three of the telltale signs you're scaling too fast.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
Outdoor staircase leading up, photo by Håkon Sataøen The Role of the Test Manager in Agile

In traditional software processes, test managers are responsible for all management aspects of their team. Agile, however, is self-directed, so teams handle all the usual duties. Still, there is a role for test managers in agile, and it’s much more strategic than it was before. Here are the opportunities for the role.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
person drawing Do Most Agile Teams Lack Creativity and Innovation?

You can’t solve the problem unless you know what that problem is, and you can’t rekindle your creativity if you just don’t know why you’re doing what you’re doing. Pinpoint your team’s purpose, let everyone on your team contribute, and rekindle the innovative nature at the core of agile.

Josiah Renaudin's picture
Josiah Renaudin
Man covering his eyes while throwing a dart The Dangers of Underplanning in Your Agile Projects

Agile coaches often stress the importance of not overplanning because work is later changed or never done at all. But consequently, many teams then fall victim to underplanning and aren't equipped for a successful project. Here are some planning activities that are critical to do before your sprints start.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
A box of crayons, photo by Leisy Vidal Self-Organization: What Your Scrum Team Can Learn from Kindergarteners

Some kindergartens are experimenting with new approaches to teaching, including letting students form groups to accomplish tasks that interest them, which also allows them to support and engage with each other. This is self-organization, the heart of Scrum. If five-year-olds can do it, your agile team likely can, too!

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Many paths leading to the same destination Scrum Isn’t the Only Path to Agility

Scrum can really help a team to become more agile. But that doesn’t mean it is the only way for a team to become agile. Agile is all about self-organizing teams collaborating to find what works for them, so if a nontraditional approach helps your team get started, then you’re just forging a new path to agility.

Thomas Stiehm's picture
Thomas Stiehm