process improvement | TechWell

process improvement

quality Are You Testing The Quality Into Your Software?

The test team shouldn’t have the onus to improve the software quality, rather the quality should already be built into the software.   A few subtle indicators can reveal if the quality isn’t being built into the software.

Richard Estra's picture
Richard Estra
Paper Requirements Discipline: Avoiding “Death by a Thousand Paper Cuts"

Absent an effective requirements baseline it is difficult to distinguish clarifications and error correction from enhancements and changes to the original ask.

Payson Hall's picture
Payson Hall
Test Teams Evaluation to Improve Effectiveness

Evaluating a test team member’s abilities is crucial in recognizing deficiencies within the team, and it provides an opportunity to outline a strategy to remedy the weaknesses. Selecting the proper method for evaluating the test team’s abilities is vital.

Richard Estra's picture
Richard Estra
Man guiding heavy equipment in a manufacturing plant How AI and Machine Learning Are Revolutionizing the Manufacturing Industry

Manufacturing tasks used to be manual up until the Industrial Revolution. We’re now experiencing another revolution, with technology making processes easier, faster, and more efficient. Today, artificial intelligence and machine learning are automating machine maintenance, optimizing inventory, and even helping out humans.

Ray Parker's picture
Ray Parker
Ideas written on sticky notes and posted to a bulletin board in order of priority Why Setting Priorities Is a Core Agile Practice

Every aspect of agile includes prioritization. The most important user stories are implemented first. Testing is prioritized to make sure features valued by customers are tested the most. Even everyday tasks are prioritized during daily standups. Here are three reasons setting priorities is essential to success in agile.

Jeffery Payne's picture
Jeffery Payne
X-ray of a computer chip Prioritizing Invisible Work

There are work items that will give the team an operational boost and perhaps avoid a crisis, but that never quite make it to the top of the priority list—like build and deployment improvements, or paying down technical debt. For enabling work that is valuable but too invisible to be a priority, consider breaking it down.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Two agile team members on a video call and wearing face masks Team Agility in a Post-Pandemic World

COVID-19 has necessitated entirely remote environments, and people the world over have had to inspect their foundations of working, adapt to a new way of remote execution, and integrate their personal and professional lives more than before. Organizational leaders need to embrace a new outlook in four critical areas.

Gautham Pallapa's picture
Gautham Pallapa
Agile team member pointing at user stories written on sticky notes What’s the Problem with User Stories?

Agile projects focus on very lightweight, simple requirements embodied in user stories. However, there are some problems with relying solely on user stories. They often don't contain enough accuracy for development, testing, or industry regulations. There's a better way to write detailed requirements that are still agile.

Adam Sandman's picture
Adam Sandman