process improvement | TechWell

process improvement

Asphalt with painted arrows pointing in three directions The Good, the Practical, and the Expedient

When a process isn't working, you'll have to make a choice that will help move things along. However, some choices are less about inspecting and adapting than about getting things done quickly, and that incurs risk. To manage this risk you need to be aware of the differences between "practical" and "expedient."

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Hand holding miniature white alarm clock An Agile Approach to Deciding When to Decide

Considering when to make certain decisions is just as important as how. “Inspect and adapt” is a valuable approach in agile, not only for product and process, but also for figuring out when to implement choices about your projects. Evaluating the reversibility, migration, and sustainability of decisions can help.

Steve Berczuk's picture
Steve Berczuk
Agile team in a huddle with their coach Making Agile Coaching Successful for Your Organization

Successful agile coaching requires a combination of experience, knowledge, and soft skills to help organizations build competence, sustainability, and performance in their agile practices. But it's not all up to the coach. There are a few things you can do to ensure your coaching engagement is set up for success.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
Test plan written out Rebuilding Your Test Strategy

If testing is taking awhile and a lot of bugs are getting into production, it's a good idea to review your entire test strategy. Spend some time understanding the current process and what testing is happening through the dev process—not what is outlined in a process wiki, but the work that actually happens.

Justin Rohrman's picture
Justin Rohrman
Sand falling through an hourglass Does Your Boss Waste Your Time?

It's good to eliminate any time-wasting practices, but that can be tricky when they come from your boss. Manager-imposed time wasters include micromanaging, holding unneeded meetings, requiring unnecessary status reports, and issuing ambiguous instructions. Here's how to broach the subject and get some time back.

Naomi Karten's picture
Naomi Karten
Round analog alarm clock Make the Most of Your Downtime with the 3 P’s

Downtime doesn’t need to mean unproductive time. It doesn’t have to be spent passively waiting for your next assignment. Instead, you can take advantage of your downtime and use it productively. If you want to maximize your downtime but don’t know where to start, focus on the three P’s: product, process, and people.

Richard Estra's picture
Richard Estra
Apple cut open to reveal an orange inside 6 Signs Your Agile Project Isn’t Really Agile

There's a trend of organizations declaring they are agile without actually changing how they develop software. Declaring that an apple is an orange doesn’t make it so. These six key indicators can help you determine whether your agile project isn’t really agile after all—and give you some solutions to help.

Alan Crouch's picture
Alan Crouch
View from above of five coworkers fist-bumping over their computers 4 Ways to Increase Software Quality and Decrease Test Time

Software testers are continually under pressure to test faster without sacrificing quality. By taking the perspective that quality is the responsibility of the entire team, not just the testers, shorter test cycles with higher quality software are possible. Here are four ways the whole team can improve releases.

Richard Estra's picture
Richard Estra